Walk above Chiguergue, Guia de Isora, using newly signposted routes.

The newly cleared path just above Chiguergue

The newly cleared path just above Chiguergue

This walk was done on September 21st to explore a newly signposted route. I had seen the signpost just above the village of Chiguergue several months before, and had tried to find out where the path went, but could find nothing on the internet, or at the tourist office in Guia de Isora. So we decided to walk it.

On the path approaching the pine zone

On the path approaching the pine zone

The signpost said it was a spur off the TF-PR  69 – a footpath from Chio to Vera de Erques. This one was numbered TF-PR 69.1 and was signposted to Chasogo 9.2km. Chasogo is a mountain on the western side of the TF-38 road from Chio to Teide, at around Km 4. However, although we did not follow the path all the way there, I now believe the signs send one to a track just below the mountain, which, if you turned left comes out on the TF-38 around Km 6.

Welcome shade from the pine trees

Welcome shade from the pine trees

I was curious about the route because I could see that it started out, across the TR-38 Teide road, with a newly-cleared footpath I was not familiar with.  So I wondered if there were a lot of newly-cleared paths in this newly signposted route.  However, it turned out it was the only section of path that I and my friends had not previously explored, since Guia de Isora ayuntamiento (local council) cleared a lot of footpaths in a project in 2007-8.  All the same it was good to see that the signage makes the route much more accessible to those who do not know the area, especially as walking in forest can be a little disorientating even if you are a good navigator.

The path crosses the Vergera Canal which transports water from above Los Realejos in the north to Guia de Isora.

The path crosses the Vergera Canal which transports water from above Los Realejos in the north to Guia de Isora.

The path took us up from Chiguergue, across the Vergera canal and onto a ridge from which was a lovely view. It continued up the ridge, then a slight diversion to the right, and again upwards till we reached the TF-38 again after its first big bend. We crossed the road between km 19 and 20 and continued upwards.

A view from the ridge when we first climbed up onto it.

A view from the ridge when we first climbed up onto it.

Soon afterwards we reached a crossroads of paths and continued upwards until we reached a signpost. By this point we had climbed 600m uphill with little respite, on a very warm day, and since we now knew where the path was going to end up, we had had enough climbing. So we decided to take the green and white signposted route downwards, going left at the signpost. It indicated the path went to Chio.

The path TF-PR 69.1 went to the right at this signpost up a footpath known locally as the Camino del Plato.  I have previously walked it and found it a very pleasant walk passing through the pine forest and coming into open country.  It passes some pahoehoe lava from Pico Viejo on its way before reaching a track in the national park.

The signpost in the woods where we turned left, downhill

The signpost in the woods where we turned left, downhill

We followed the Chio signs down to cross the TF-38 again between Km 18 and 19. After crossing the road the path crossed a track and then rejoined the same track lower down. At this point we could have gone left onto a faint, but clear track and later turned right down another path descending another ridge to arrive back near where we started. Instead we continued down the green and white path, which for a while was comfortable walking as it followed a smooth pahoehoe lava with large crystals in it.

The path here was paved by a smooth pahoehoe lava flow with large crystals in it.

The path here was paved by a smooth pahoehoe lava flow with large crystals in it.

 

 

However, after crossing a track, the descending path became very unpleasant to walk, being steep and covered in loose rocks. Eventually it came down to the TF-38 just above Chio, and we had to turn left and walk approximately 2 km along the road to get back to where we started.

The loose stony path down to Chio

The loose stony path down to Chio

 

 

 

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About Sally Whymark

When I retired and moved out to Tenerife a few years ago, one of the things I really wanted to do was go walking in the mountains. The scenery is very dramatic, and varied. The views are amazing. The native birds and butterflies and other fauna are remarkable. But the flowers - they're just stunning. Little did I know how this would fire up my interest in plants. While living in England, I had always had an interest in flowers and plants, indeed I ran a plant nursery with my husband for many years, but had not spent a great deal of time pursuing botany. But when walking in Tenerife, I noticed all the unfamiliar shapes of the local flowers, and longed to find out more about them. There are literally hundreds of species endemic to just Tenerife (or even just one part of it), the Canary Islands, or Macronesia (the Atlantic Islands, including Madeira, Canaries and Azores). They are so exciting, and so many of them are really showy as well. So I have started this blog to share with you my excitement at all the great sights I see when walking in Tenerife. I hope you'll enjoy it - and want to come here and experience it for yourself.

Posted on October 18, 2015, in Walks in Tenerife, West Tenerife and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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