A short walk from Tamaimo

The start of the climb up to the Cruz de los Misioneros, with a tall specimen of Canary Tree Bindweed (Convolvulus floridus) in full flower on the right of the path

The start of the climb up to the Cruz de los Misioneros, with a tall specimen of Canary Tree Bindweed (Convolvulus floridus) in full flower on the right of the path

Another walk from Tamaimo, which had plenty of floral interest. We did it last Wednesday, 22nd April, on a glorious sunny day, so the views from the ridge above Tamaimo were great.

The climb towards the Cruz de los Misioneros

The climb towards the Cruz de los Misioneros

We went up the path signposted to the Cruz de los misioneros, which climbs steeply up to the white cross on the ridge to the north of Tamaimo. The path is steep but easy to follow and with plenty of rock steps making the walking easy. It was not the dangerously loose scree path I remembered descending a number of years ago, so that was a pleasant surprise. That was the main reason I had not walked this path since then. So the first half of the walk was relatively new to us, but the second half was the same as end of the walk we did in February which I wrote a blog about entitled A scenic and botanically interesting circular walk from Tamaimo, Santiago del Teide

Aeonium sedifolium was hanging off the rocks and cliffs

Aeonium sedifolium was hanging off the rocks and cliffs

We walked from the church in Tamaimo following the yellow and white signs to the Cruz de los misioneros till we came onto a footpath taking us to the barranco streambed, which we crossed, and began the ascent, following the signs.

The Cruz de los Misioneros, on a rocky knoll with beautiful views

The Cruz de los Misioneros, on a rocky knoll with beautiful views

'Queen's crown', Corona de la Reina (Gonospermum fruticosum)

‘Queen’s crown’, Corona de la Reina (Gonospermum fruticosum)

The Retama (Retama raetam)bushes and the Canary Tree Bindweed (Convolvulus floridus), were both covered in white flowers from the barranco streambed until quite high up the ridge. As we neared the top the rocks had clumps of Aeonium sedifolium hanging off them, covered in yellow flowers, and there were also the yellow flowers of the “Queen’s crown” (Corona de la reina) (Gonospermum fruticosum) and the Madama (Allagopappus dichotomus). On the top of the ridge there were also a lot of Kicksia scoparia again with yellow flowers, with a spur on the base, blowing in the wind on their grass-like stems.

The waving stems of Kicksia scoparia on the rocky ridge.  It was also very plentiful on the path down.

The waving stems of Kicksia scoparia on the rocky ridge. It was also very plentiful on the path down.

We walked up to the knoll where the cross is mounted and enjoyed the beautiful views in all directions, including to Teide, the Santiago Valley and Teno. Then we decided to continue following the yellow and white marked trail up higher to cross the top of the Montaña de Gauma and then down the ridge.  The climb from the Cruz de los Misioneros to the top of Mt Guama was steep with many rock steps which were easily climbed, ably led by Andy Tenerife Walker who does Guided walking for tourists.  Visit his Facebook page and website for more information if you are interested.   http://www.tenerife-guided-walks.comMadama (Allagopappus dichotomus)

Madama (Allagopappus dichotomus)

As we continued down the ridge the vegetation was dominated by Retama and canarian Spurges (Euphorbia lamarckii mixed with the Retama, and Euphorbia canariensis on the rocky bits). However, as we descended other plants were interspersed, including Parolinia intermedia, Neochamaelea pulverulenta, and Justicia hyssopifolia. All of these I mentioned and illustrated in my previous blog, but the Justicia was not then in flower, so I have added a picture with flowers this time.

Andy Tenerife Walker leading the way up some rock steps on the path above the Cruz de los Misioneros.  There were several rock steps like this before we reached the top of Mt Guama

Andy Tenerife Walker leading the way up some rock steps on the path above the Cruz de los Misioneros. There were several rock steps like this before we reached the top of Mt Guama

View from Mt Guama to the coast

View from Mt Guama to the coast

We continued down the path till it turned left to descend to the valley, and had our lunch break on the rocks overlooking the Los Gigantes harbour. Then we went down into the valley, turning left at a T-junction of paths with a signpost, to return to Tamaimo.

The view to Los Gigantes harbour, from our lunch spot

The view to Los Gigantes harbour, from our lunch spot

 

The walk took us 3.75 hours and was approximately 7km / 4.4miles long with 492m of ascent.

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About Sally Whymark

When I retired and moved out to Tenerife a few years ago, one of the things I really wanted to do was go walking in the mountains. The scenery is very dramatic, and varied. The views are amazing. The native birds and butterflies and other fauna are remarkable. But the flowers - they're just stunning. Little did I know how this would fire up my interest in plants. While living in England, I had always had an interest in flowers and plants, indeed I ran a plant nursery with my husband for many years, but had not spent a great deal of time pursuing botany. But when walking in Tenerife, I noticed all the unfamiliar shapes of the local flowers, and longed to find out more about them. There are literally hundreds of species endemic to just Tenerife (or even just one part of it), the Canary Islands, or Macronesia (the Atlantic Islands, including Madeira, Canaries and Azores). They are so exciting, and so many of them are really showy as well. So I have started this blog to share with you my excitement at all the great sights I see when walking in Tenerife. I hope you'll enjoy it - and want to come here and experience it for yourself.

Posted on April 23, 2015, in Walks in Tenerife, West Tenerife and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Great to see this – makes me recall our Tenerife resident days and walking research there. Still one of my all-time favourite places.

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