Las Lajas Parque Recreativo (Vilaflor) to the Sombrero de Chasna

Near the start of the new path from Las Lajas park to the start of the climb.

Near the start of the new path from Las Lajas park to the start of the climb.

This is a walk that has a wow factor at any time of year, but after Mt Teide has had some snow, the view at the top of the walk is that much better. So yesterday (10th January) we decided to go on it, from the barbecue park of Las Lajas, above Vilaflor, around km 59 on the main road from Vilaflor to Boca de Tauce and Teide.

The new path below the road, gets very close to the road at this point

The new path below the road, gets very close to the road at this point

One of our group had noticed recently that there is now a new path going from the BBQ park to the point where we start the climb towards the Sombrero de Chasna. Before we used to walk down the road for nearly a kilometre to reach the start of the path, which is by a couple of ruined cottages. However, now there is a much better start to this walk, with a pleasant stroll through the pine forest, just below the road, which then crosses underneath the road to the start of the climb. The path starts by the toilets, which you can find by following the path from a sign saying ‘W.C.’ from the parking area.

Continuing on the new path avoiding the walk down the main road

Continuing on the new path avoiding the walk down the main road

From the ruined cottages the path begins to climb gently but soon splits up into various routes. We took a left turn, marked with large white paint arrows, which climbs quite steeply on a very clear path, however, going straight on is probably a gentler climb, and does join up with the same path higher up.

The tunnel under the main road to reach the ruined cottages where the path upwards starts

The tunnel under the main road to reach the ruined cottages where the path upwards starts

 

 

 

 

The path climbs through the pine forest and usually there are fine views to the coast, but yesterday they were blanked out by dust in the air due to a calima (weather from the east with saharan dust). Then the circular rocky outcrop, shaped a bit like a hat, which is Sombrero de Chasna comes into view, across a valley. Soon afterwards the path goes along a flatter piece of ridge with some fine old pines with old circular enclosures beneath them, probably a relic of the pastoral use the forest was formerly put to. Then, the top of the walk, comes into sight, the edge of the caldera wall around Las Cañadas.

A view up from the path to the Sombrero, a smaller hat-like rock to the west of the Sombrero de Chasna

A view up from the path to the Sombrerito, a smaller hat-like rock to the west of the Sombrero de Chasna

The last bit of the climb is steep, zig-zagging up a pumice slope, and as you approach the top you get a glimpse of the top of Mt Teide, and then more and more of it till you reach the edge of the caldera. There was snow lying in the dips, and shaded points on the climb, and on the north-facing cliffs of the caldera wall, and dusting the tops of Mt Teide, Mt Blanca, and Mt Guajara.

A view of the Sombrero de Chasna

A view of the Sombrero de Chasna

 

 

 

We walked along the edge of the caldera a short distance, enjoying the fabulous views, had our lunch break, and then descended towards the Sombrero. On this occasion we did not climb it, but passed by the path up it, and continued down into the valley below it. Here the path is quite rough and rocky, then arrives at a fork, where we took the right turn to rise gently back to the ridge we walked up. We walked down the ridge a short distance and then turned right onto path no 31, next to a map signboard, to continue our descent directly back to the BBQ park.

Lying snow on the path as Mt Teide first comes into view ahead

Lying snow on the path as Mt Teide first comes into view ahead

Descending the valley beside the Sombrero, passing a standing rock, with lines of snow on its north side

Descending the valley beside the Sombrero, passing a standing rock, with lines of snow on its north side

Another view of the Sombrerito from the path 31 as we descended back to Las Lajas

Another view of the Sombrerito from the path 31 as we descended back to Las Lajas

This walk was 9.67 km (6 miles) long with 513 m (1260ft) of accumulated ascent.  It took our group about 3.5 hrs.

 

 

 

A GPS track of this walk can be found at the following link:

http://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/view.do?id=8736595

The track can be viewed there on various maps, and printed out if required.

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About Sally Whymark

When I retired and moved out to Tenerife a few years ago, one of the things I really wanted to do was go walking in the mountains. The scenery is very dramatic, and varied. The views are amazing. The native birds and butterflies and other fauna are remarkable. But the flowers - they're just stunning. Little did I know how this would fire up my interest in plants. While living in England, I had always had an interest in flowers and plants, indeed I ran a plant nursery with my husband for many years, but had not spent a great deal of time pursuing botany. But when walking in Tenerife, I noticed all the unfamiliar shapes of the local flowers, and longed to find out more about them. There are literally hundreds of species endemic to just Tenerife (or even just one part of it), the Canary Islands, or Macronesia (the Atlantic Islands, including Madeira, Canaries and Azores). They are so exciting, and so many of them are really showy as well. So I have started this blog to share with you my excitement at all the great sights I see when walking in Tenerife. I hope you'll enjoy it - and want to come here and experience it for yourself.

Posted on January 11, 2015, in South Tenerife, Walks in Tenerife and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. Hi Sally, we are continuing to work our way through your book having done the mounts Chinyero and Negra last week. I was hoping for more explicit instructions or a map for the above walk as it is not in your book. Any chance of this, or do we not need it?

    • Hi Michael,
      I hope you are enjoying the walks in the book. As you will have gathered if you have looked through the blog, the descriptions of the walks are not as detailed as in the book, and are meant to give a taste of some of the other walks to be found in Tenerife. However, I have now amended this walk by adding a link to Wikiloc where you can see the track on various types of map and can download a GPS track if you have a GPS device. The walk itself does not need much description as the paths are very clear and signposted, except for the last bit of the downhill part, where we followed some minor paths to come out opposite the entrance to Las Lajas. If you follow the official path you come out on the road just below the picnic site and need to go right and walk along it until you get there.

  2. Hi Sally just to feedback that we did this walk on Tuesday and it was tough for us with the thin air but well worth the effort as the day was beautiful and sunny and the scenery was stunning.
    Thanks also for introducing me to Wikiloc which I had not used before. I am now using this great facility on Mac, iPad, iPhone and Garmin, great.We found the walk reasonably easy to follow though there were few markers on the downward route. Found a longer Las Vegas circular on wiki and intending to do this in the next couple of weeks also. Keep up the good work. Regards Michael and Susan Patey.

  3. Meant to feed this back before now. We did the extended Las Vegas circular which basically included the walk up the Barranco LV from the beginning and then cut in back to the circular on descent from the barranco. Quite hard work for us but good walk with some interesting things to take in. Going back to England for the summer soon and really going to miss the mountains. Walking in the Surrey hills is pretty but now quite the same. We have also learnt much about the islands history through the walk. We have managed 206 miles since the beginning of October so very pleased. Many thanks for your help.

    • Thanks for your comments. I have noticed your contributions to Wikiloc so know you’ve been getting around! Glad you have enjoyed your walking in Tenerife. Surrey will seem tame after Tenerife, but it is still very pretty – I grew up there and did my first hiking there. Enjoy your summer.
      Sally

      Sent from my iPad

      >

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