Revisiting the Barranco de Erques walk, with a shorter version

The path descending the opposite side of the Barranco near the start (and end) of the walk

The path descending the opposite side of the Barranco near the start (and end) of the walk

I wrote a blog about this walk earlier this year, on 15th February, entitled ‘The Barranco de Erques, Vera de Erques and Tejina’.  However, one friend who did not go on that walk wanted to do it too, so we chose to do it on 30th July. Normally we would not have walked it in the summer, due to lack of shade, but this was a cloudy day. It was, however, quite humid and warm, so the climbing was a little sticky, and we decided to do a shorter version, missing out the Camino Montiel and Las Fuentes, and heading down from Vera de Erques to complete a shorter circle.

The Sea Rosemary (Campylanthus salsaloides) was still in flower

The Sea Rosemary (Campylanthus salsaloides) was still in flower

Consequently, when we reached the main square of Vera de Erques, near the church, we turned left and took the next left off that road to descend a road that wandered around various attractive houses and gardens and join the main road lower down, where we crossed it, going slightly to the right to take a path descending from the bend. The path follows the southern edge of a barranco till it reaches a small group of houses, and a narrow tarmac road which we continued on for a few yards before taking a sharp right turn to descend into the barranco on the path again. This part passes numerous animal pens for dogs, chickens, rabbits and even a small black pig, before crossing the streamed and ascending the opposite side.

Madama still in flower beneath a rock overhang beside the path ascending out of the Barranco de Erques

Madama (Allagopappus dichotomous) still in flower beneath a rock overhang beside the path ascending out of the Barranco de Erques

 

 

 

The path then crossed a concrete driveway and continued along a house wall before turning downhill again. Lower down the path turned right to cross another barranco, but this time we went straight on to join a track passing some buildings. The track joined the main road going up to Vera de Erques again, and we went right on it to a hundred metres or so, turned right onto the road to Tejina, and then turned left off that road about 100m further on.

The path, Camino La Morra, heading back towards the Barranco de Erques, with water pipes.

The path, Camino La Morra, heading back towards the Barranco de Erques, with water pipes.

 

 

 

Within a few metres we turned onto a dirt track going straight ahead, instead of following the tarmac road to the right, slightly lower than the track.  We were now back on the route returning to the Barranco de Erques crossing which we started at.

Lesser white bugloss (Echium aculeatum) was still in flower in a damp spot along the Camino la Morra

Lesser white bugloss (Echium aculeatum) was still in flower in a damp spot along the Camino la Morra

This shorter version of the walk was only 8.72km as opposed to 12.03km for the longer version. It took us 4.25 hours at a slower pace due to the warmth and humidity.

 

 

The Camino La Morra ascending to the village of Vera de Erques along the edge of the Barranco de Erques

The Camino La Morra ascending to the village of Vera de Erques along the edge of the Barranco de Erques

(Update 2.3.2015) A GPS track of this shortened walk is now available on Wikiloc:

 

http://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/view.do?id=8983364

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some fine bunches of ripening grapes hanging over a wall in the village of Vera de Erques

Some fine bunches of ripening grapes hanging over a wall in the village of Vera de Erques

The red, 3-cornered seed heads of the Canary spurge (Euphorbia canariensis)

The red, 3-cornered seed heads of the Canary spurge (Euphorbia canariensis)

Cardo de Cristo, or Willow-leaved carline thistle (Carlina salicifolia)

Cardo de Cristo, or Willow-leaved carline thistle (Carlina salicifolia)

Advertisements

About Sally Whymark

When I retired and moved out to Tenerife a few years ago, one of the things I really wanted to do was go walking in the mountains. The scenery is very dramatic, and varied. The views are amazing. The native birds and butterflies and other fauna are remarkable. But the flowers - they're just stunning. Little did I know how this would fire up my interest in plants. While living in England, I had always had an interest in flowers and plants, indeed I ran a plant nursery with my husband for many years, but had not spent a great deal of time pursuing botany. But when walking in Tenerife, I noticed all the unfamiliar shapes of the local flowers, and longed to find out more about them. There are literally hundreds of species endemic to just Tenerife (or even just one part of it), the Canary Islands, or Macronesia (the Atlantic Islands, including Madeira, Canaries and Azores). They are so exciting, and so many of them are really showy as well. So I have started this blog to share with you my excitement at all the great sights I see when walking in Tenerife. I hope you'll enjoy it - and want to come here and experience it for yourself.

Posted on August 17, 2014, in Botanical interest, West Tenerife and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Hi there – is do you know if it’s possible to walk up Barranco de Erques from the lowest point near the coast? Is this accessible? Our undergraduate field course returns to Tenerife in April and I’m looking for a short excursion the afternoon of our arrival.

    • How lovely to be doing a field course in Tenerife in April. I am afraid I have never walked up the Barranco de Erques, as I have been unable to persuade friends to join me as they are not interested in the nature! I did try walking a little way up from the crossing described in the above blog, but it was very rough, and there were places where there would be waterfalls when the barranco flows, which either have to be scrambled up or circumvented if possible. Consequently the friends I was with very quickly chickened out! I don’t know what it is like below that crossing. I really only know the Barranco from the few crossings of footpaths that I know, all of which are delightful. If you want another suggestion for your short excursion let me know where you are staying, and what kind of excursion you are looking for – botanical? geological? etc. and I will try to think of something to suggest.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: