Revisiting the Arona walk on Camino del Topo and Camino de Suárez

Sea squill (Drimia maritima)  beside a water channel

Sea squill (Drimia maritima) beside a water channel

I described this walk after we had done it in September 2013 in a previous post entitled “A delightful walk from Arona”.  I mentioned then that we did not often walk it in summer due to the lack of shade. However, this year July had a lot of cloudy weather, which continued into early August and we chose to do this walk on a cloudy day, the 2nd August. In fact when we reached the highest point we were in the cloud briefly, and had no views to the coast from the threshing floor between Roque Imoque and Roque de los Brezos, but we were below the cloud most of the time.

Prickly pear flower (Opuntia sp) near the old farmhouse half-way up the Camino del Topo.

Prickly pear flower (Opuntia sp) near the old farmhouse half-way up the Camino del Topo.

I am just adding a few pictures of the flowers we saw at this time of year. Some are typical of the time of year, others are normally over by this time of year, but the wet winter, coupled with the recent humid and cooler weather has extended the flowering period.

 

 

 

 

Canary Bird's foot Trefoil (Lotus sessilifolius) still in flower in July

Canary Bird’s foot Trefoil (Lotus sessilifolius) still in flower in July

 

 

Narrow-leaved cistus (Cistus monspeliensis)

Narrow-leaved cistus (Cistus monspeliensis)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wild aniseed (Bupleurum salicifolium) a Macronesian endemic which flowers in June/July

Wild aniseed (Bupleurum salicifolium) a Macronesian endemic which flowers in June/July

A view from the north side of Roque del Conde where the flat top is not so notable as from the south or west

A view from the north side of Roque del Conde where the flat top is not so notable as from the south or west

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canary tree bindweed (Convolvulus floridus), a Canary endemic which normally flowers in May.

Canary tree bindweed (Convolvulus floridus), a Canary endemic which normally flowers in May.

Canary spurge (Euphorbia canariensis) with its lovely red, 3-cornered seed pods

Canary spurge (Euphorbia canariensis) with its lovely red, 3-cornered seed pods

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Small copper butterfly (Lycaena phlaeas)

Small copper butterfly (Lycaena phlaeas)

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About Sally Whymark

When I retired and moved out to Tenerife a few years ago, one of the things I really wanted to do was go walking in the mountains. The scenery is very dramatic, and varied. The views are amazing. The native birds and butterflies and other fauna are remarkable. But the flowers - they're just stunning. Little did I know how this would fire up my interest in plants. While living in England, I had always had an interest in flowers and plants, indeed I ran a plant nursery with my husband for many years, but had not spent a great deal of time pursuing botany. But when walking in Tenerife, I noticed all the unfamiliar shapes of the local flowers, and longed to find out more about them. There are literally hundreds of species endemic to just Tenerife (or even just one part of it), the Canary Islands, or Macronesia (the Atlantic Islands, including Madeira, Canaries and Azores). They are so exciting, and so many of them are really showy as well. So I have started this blog to share with you my excitement at all the great sights I see when walking in Tenerife. I hope you'll enjoy it - and want to come here and experience it for yourself.

Posted on August 17, 2014, in Botanical interest, South Tenerife and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Nice, very nice. We have had quite a warm summer especially in July. Now it is cooler and we have had some rain. It was needed even if it is not as  much fun. Still people walk around in tee shirts but I have a jacket on today since it rained. But even yesterday it was warm enough in the sun to just walk in a tee for me too.

    We will arrive in Tenerife on Sep 22 in the pm. So it wont be very much longer as time seems to just run by.

    See you then. Eva

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