A couple of walks in the laurel forests of Anaga

I have been busy lately and not had a lot of time to write about some walks I have done recently, but I am just going to share some photos of the scenery and flowers.

Forest bindweed (Convolvulus canariensis), a  Canary endemic which grows in the laurel forests

Forest bindweed (Convolvulus canariensis), a Canary endemic which grows in the laurel forests

Woundwort - (Stachys ocymastrum) seen on the edge of the forest area

Woundwort – (Stachys ocymastrum) seen on the edge of the forest area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canary Arum Lily (Dracunculus canariensis) a Canary endemic, beside the path. The large white spathes are past their best, and drooping, but it is a remarkable plant.

Canary Arum Lily (Dracunculus canariensis) a Canary endemic, beside the path. The large white spathes are past their best, and drooping, but it is a remarkable plant.

A Cleopatra butterfly (Gonepteryx cleopatra) feeding on Pitch trefoil (Psoralea bituminosa). The Cleopatras are spectacular large yellow butterflies, but very difficult to photograph with their wings open. Lots of them were flying in sunny spots in the forest and at the forest edges.

A Cleopatra butterfly (Gonepteryx cleopatra) feeding on Pitch trefoil (Psoralea bituminosa). The Cleopatras are spectacular large yellow butterflies, but very difficult to photograph with their wings open. Lots of them were flying in sunny spots in the forest and at the forest edges.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flowers and buds of Climbing butcher's broom (Semele androgen).  The flowers, and later the berries, are on the edges of what looks like leaves, but are actually modified stems, or cladodes.  This species is a Macronesian  (Atlantic Islands) endemic associated with laurel forests.

Flowers and buds of Climbing butcher’s broom (Semele androgyna). The flowers, and later the berries, are on the edges of what looks like leaves, but are actually modified stems, or cladodes. This species is a Macronesian (Atlantic Islands) endemic associated with laurel forests.

Annual houseleek (Aichryson laxum ), another Canary endemic associated with the laurel forest, liking shade and damp.

Annual houseleek (Aichryson laxum ), another Canary endemic associated with the laurel forest, liking shade and damp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canary Guelder rose (Viburnum rigidum), a Canary endemic common in the laurel forests

Canary Guelder rose (Viburnum rigidum), a Canary endemic common in the laurel forests

An open area of the Pista de las Hiedras (Ivy Lane!)

An open area of the Pista de las Hiedras (Ivy Lane!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Large-leaved St John's wort (Hypericum grandifolium), a Macronesian endemic associated with laurel forests

Large-leaved St John’s wort (Hypericum grandifolium), a Macronesian endemic associated with laurel forests

A view of the rugged landscape of Anaga

A view of the rugged landscape of Anaga

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Canary speckled wood butterfly (Pararge xiphioides).  They are very plentiful in the dappled sunshine in the woods

A Canary speckled wood butterfly (Pararge xiphioides). They are very plentiful in the dappled sunshine in the woods

Anaga sow-thistle (Sonchus congestus). A Canary endemic

Anaga sow-thistle (Sonchus congestus). A Canary endemic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canary Figwort (Scrophularia smithii). A canary endemic

Canary Figwort (Scrophularia smithii). A canary endemic

Capitana (Phyllis nobla). A Macronesian endemic associated with laurel forests

Capitana (Phyllis nobla). A Macronesian endemic associated with laurel forests

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Red Tree Heath (Erica scoparia)- Tejo in spanish. Very common in the exposed ridges and edges of the laurel forest

Red Tree Heath (Erica scoparia)- Tejo in spanish. Very common in the exposed ridges and edges of the laurel forest

The walks I took to see these delightful and very special plants can be found at the following links.  The first one is a very easy walk, suitable for people who do not do much walking, which lasted 1.5 hours. The second was longer, taking just over 4 hours, with more climbing and descent, but still not a particularly arduous walk for those used to walking.  Both walks can have slippery surfaces, especially on slopes, when damp (very frequently in these forests!), so good footwear with good grip, and sticks if you use them, are advisable.

http://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/view.do?id=6444196

 

http://www.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/view.do?id=4547100

 

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About Sally Whymark

When I retired and moved out to Tenerife a few years ago, one of the things I really wanted to do was go walking in the mountains. The scenery is very dramatic, and varied. The views are amazing. The native birds and butterflies and other fauna are remarkable. But the flowers - they're just stunning. Little did I know how this would fire up my interest in plants. While living in England, I had always had an interest in flowers and plants, indeed I ran a plant nursery with my husband for many years, but had not spent a great deal of time pursuing botany. But when walking in Tenerife, I noticed all the unfamiliar shapes of the local flowers, and longed to find out more about them. There are literally hundreds of species endemic to just Tenerife (or even just one part of it), the Canary Islands, or Macronesia (the Atlantic Islands, including Madeira, Canaries and Azores). They are so exciting, and so many of them are really showy as well. So I have started this blog to share with you my excitement at all the great sights I see when walking in Tenerife. I hope you'll enjoy it - and want to come here and experience it for yourself.

Posted on May 25, 2014, in Anaga, Botanical interest, Walks in Tenerife and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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