Another circular walk from Las Vegas, Granadilla de Abona

A view up the barranco with climbing cliffs on the left, and Mt Guajara in the distance on the right

I walked this route last Saturday, March 8th, and it was such a delight for all the flowers and scents, I had to blog about it. Las Vegas is a charming village in a very beautiful area of the south of Tenerife, and it is always lovely to walk there, but at this time of the year the flowers make it even more of a treat.

Canary Bryony  (Bryonia verrucosa) with yellow flowers and round stripy fruits scrambling though an orange tree in full blossom

Canary Bryony (Bryonia verrucosa) with yellow flowers and round stripy fruits scrambling though an orange tree in full blossom

 

 

 

We started the walk from the bottom of the village, where the old Camino Real (Royal Road) enters and leaves the village. Caminos Reales were the modern highways of the sixteenth and seventeenth century, when the landowners, who were gifted the land in return for services rendered in the conquest of the island, were required by the Spanish crown to construct and maintain roads connecting the main towns and ports. The road goes up to Las Vegas, which seems now to be an insignificant village, because it was an important early settlement due to its prosperous farmland and good water supply. There are some fine old houses in the village, including one which is used as a Casa Rural for holidaymakers.

 

Leaving the barranco we passed this Canary whin (Teline canariensis) in full flower in front of a beautiful pine tree (Pinus canariensis)

Leaving the barranco we passed this Canary whin (Teline canariensis) in full flower in front of a beautiful pine tree (Pinus canariensis)

We walked up through the village and straight on up a track that continues where the tarmac finishes. We passed a wrought iron gate on the left leading into a vineyard, and continued to the next turning left which had a chain across it suspended between 2 barrels filled with concrete. We squeezed past the barrels and walked the path down to the barranco streambed and across it following the cairn, and up the other side. The path is narrow and passes through flowering shrubs, including Tenerife Vipers bugloss (Echium virescens), Vinegrera (Rumex lunaria), Bitter spurge (Euphorbia lamarckii) and Canary madder (Rubia fruticosa). In the midst of this profusion is a small grove of neglected orange trees, which were covered in sweet-scented blossom. Growing over the orange trees and some of the other shrubs was the local Canary endemic Bryony (Bryonia verrucosa) with both flowers and fruits.

 

Canary vetch (Vicia cirrhosa), an endemic annual plant scrambling through a Narrow-leaved cistus plant (Cistus monspeliensis)

Canary vetch (Vicia cirrhosa), an endemic annual plant scrambling through a Narrow-leaved cistus plant (Cistus monspeliensis)

 

The path climbs out of the barranco past some rock cliffs used by local rock-climbers, and near the top the Canary endemic of the Broom family, Teline canariensis at the edge of the barranco we took a track to the right past a reservoir, which then became a path going up the edge of the barranco, with lovely views. This path is somewhat stony, which on the steep bits are quite dangerous when walking down, which is why we tackled this bit of the walk first, going upwards, when the path is OK.  The plants around were mainly the White-flowered cistus (Cistus monspeliensis), but draped over some of them was the Canary endemic annual vetch Vicia cirrhosa. 

 

The male flowers of the Canary Pine tree (Pinus canariensis) full of pollen

The male flowers of the Canary Pine tree (Pinus canariensis) full of pollen

 

 

 

We continued upwards, reaching a track which was driveable. It was at this point there is a junction with another path crossing the barranco, but we continued uphill along the barranco edge, taking a shortcut with no path, and then joining a path to continue past neglected vineyards to join the track. This time we stayed with the track even when it turned away from the barranco, and followed it for about 500m till we saw a footpath going to the right which we took, continuing right at a junction with a better footpath. This took us across back towards the barranco on a good footpath till it reached a junction with the yellow and white signposted footpath from Las Vegas to the Lunar landscape. Here we turned right, downhill at last. From here on we followed the signposted path all the way back to Las Vegas.

 

A section of the path up the  West side of the barranco. It is very stony and better to go up than descend.

A section of the path up the West side of the barranco. It is very stony and better to go up than descend.

Soon we passed an era (threshing floor) where we had lunch and then continued down the zig-zagging path till it squeezed through between rocks to re-enter the barranco. This section down the cliff and into the barranco was again full of flowers, including the Palomera (Pericallis lanata) on the cliffs, Canary mountain figwort (Scrophularia glabrata), and more Tenerife Vipers Bugloss, etc in the barranco. There were also some of the very pretty Tassel hyacinths (Muscari comosum).

 

Palomera (Pericallis lanata), a Canary endemic which loves to grow on rocks

Palomera (Pericallis lanata), a Canary endemic which loves to grow on rocks

 

The path down through the barranco was delightful. Tall flowering shrubs tower either side of it, with glimpses to the scenic rocky cliffs either side. The path is generally easy to walk, so you can enjoy the flowers and the views.

 

The path descending into the barranco beside yet more scenic cliffs

The path descending into the barranco beside yet more scenic cliffs

 

 

 

Tassel hyacinth (Muscari comosum). A widespread and common bulbous plant of the Mediterranean region.

Tassel hyacinth (Muscari comosum). A widespread and common bulbous plant of the Mediterranean region.

 

 

 

 

 

At one point, the yellow and white signposted path takes a sharp left off a stony path to cross a barranco and descend by a lovely ridge. On this section I was delighted to see on the path a very small Campanula I have only once seen before. It is barely 15cm / 6in high with little blue bell flowers about 1.5cm across, but it is another Canary endemic Campanula occidentalis.

 

The signposted path through the barranco, with the white-flowered Escobón shrubs (Chaemacytisus proliferus) beside it.

The signposted path through the barranco, with the white-flowered Escobón shrubs (Chaemacytisus proliferus) beside it.

 

Western campanula (Campanula occidentalis) is a tiny plant, here in the path itself, another Canary endemic

Western campanula (Campanula occidentalis) is a tiny plant, here in the path itself, another Canary endemic

 

 

The walk took us just under 4 hours walking at quite a fast pace. It was 10.77 km/ 6.75 ml long and involved 626m of climbing and descent.

 

 

 

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About Sally Whymark

When I retired and moved out to Tenerife a few years ago, one of the things I really wanted to do was go walking in the mountains. The scenery is very dramatic, and varied. The views are amazing. The native birds and butterflies and other fauna are remarkable. But the flowers - they're just stunning. Little did I know how this would fire up my interest in plants. While living in England, I had always had an interest in flowers and plants, indeed I ran a plant nursery with my husband for many years, but had not spent a great deal of time pursuing botany. But when walking in Tenerife, I noticed all the unfamiliar shapes of the local flowers, and longed to find out more about them. There are literally hundreds of species endemic to just Tenerife (or even just one part of it), the Canary Islands, or Macronesia (the Atlantic Islands, including Madeira, Canaries and Azores). They are so exciting, and so many of them are really showy as well. So I have started this blog to share with you my excitement at all the great sights I see when walking in Tenerife. I hope you'll enjoy it - and want to come here and experience it for yourself.

Posted on March 14, 2014, in Botanical interest, South Tenerife, Walks in Tenerife and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. It looks exceptionally lush and green after the rains of winter.

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