Aldea Blanca to San Miguel walk revisited

A view towards Buzanada and Mt Guaza with Canary spurge (Cardón) (Euphorbia canariensis) in the foreground

A view towards Buzanada and Mt Guaza with Canary spurge (Cardón) (Euphorbia canariensis) in the foreground

The circular walk from Aldea Blanca to San Miguel and back is Walk 13 in the book ‘Tenerife Nature Walks’ so I will not describe the walk here, just add some more pictures of the flowers and scenery we saw when we walked it on the 15th January. Hope you enjoy them.

Fagonia cretica, a common creeping plant of sandy areas near the coast

Fagonia cretica, a common creeping plant of sandy areas near the coast

Chicken wire plant, (Aulaga), (Launaea arborescens), a prickly low bush of coastal areas and lower slopes.

Chicken wire plant, (Aulaga), (Launaea arborescens), a prickly low bush of coastal areas and lower slopes.

Kickxia scoparia, a canarian endemic plant found near the coast, and on lower slopes

Kickxia scoparia, a canarian endemic plant found near the coast, and on lower slopes

Canary madder, (Tasaigo) (Rubia fruticosa), an endemic of Macronesia (Atlantic islands)

Canary madder, (Tasaigo) (Rubia fruticosa), an endemic of Macronesia (Atlantic islands)

A rock formation above the path, with Asparagus umbellatus in flower in the foreground

A rock formation above the path, with Asparagus umbellatus in flower in the foreground

Bitter spurge (Tabaiba amarga) (Euphorbia lamarckii) in the foreground with the Barranco del Drago behind.

Bitter spurge (Tabaiba amarga) (Euphorbia lamarckii) in the foreground with the Barranco del Drago behind.

Canary bird's foot trefoil, (Corazoncillo canario) (Lotus sessilifolius), another Canary endemic

Canary bird’s foot trefoil, (Corazoncillo canario) (Lotus sessilifolius), another Canary endemic

Canary lavender (Lavendula canariensis), another Canary endemic, but here the usual blue form is accompanied by an unusual pink-flowered sport which was fairly common on the descent from San Miguel.

Canary lavender (Lavendula canariensis), another Canary endemic, but here the usual blue form is accompanied by an unusual pink-flowered sport which was fairly common on the descent from San Miguel.

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About Sally Whymark

When I retired and moved out to Tenerife a few years ago, one of the things I really wanted to do was go walking in the mountains. The scenery is very dramatic, and varied. The views are amazing. The native birds and butterflies and other fauna are remarkable. But the flowers - they're just stunning. Little did I know how this would fire up my interest in plants. While living in England, I had always had an interest in flowers and plants, indeed I ran a plant nursery with my husband for many years, but had not spent a great deal of time pursuing botany. But when walking in Tenerife, I noticed all the unfamiliar shapes of the local flowers, and longed to find out more about them. There are literally hundreds of species endemic to just Tenerife (or even just one part of it), the Canary Islands, or Macronesia (the Atlantic Islands, including Madeira, Canaries and Azores). They are so exciting, and so many of them are really showy as well. So I have started this blog to share with you my excitement at all the great sights I see when walking in Tenerife. I hope you'll enjoy it - and want to come here and experience it for yourself.

Posted on February 2, 2014, in Botanical interest, South Tenerife, Walks in Tenerife and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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