A walk from El Portillo to La Fortaleza in the Teide National Park at flowering time

Left to right: Flixweed (Descourainia bourgaeana), Canary wallflower (Erysimum scoparium) and Teide vipers bugloss (Echium wildpretii), near the visitor centre at El Portillo

Left to right: Flixweed (Descourainia bourgaeana), Canary wallflower (Erysimum scoparium) and Teide vipers bugloss (Echium wildpretii), near the visitor centre at El Portillo

The scree slope beneath the cliffs of La Fortaleza is full of flowering plants, including the Teide vipers bugloss (Echium wildpretii) and Flixweed (Descourainia bourgaeana)

The scree slope beneath the cliffs of La Fortaleza is full of flowering plants, including the Teide vipers bugloss (Echium wildpretii) and Flixweed (Descourainia bourgaeana)

A group of mouflon, an introduced species of wild sheep, which are very shy and rarely seen. This was the first time I had seen them.

Again I do not have time to write a full walk description, although there is one in my book – Walk 32.  It is a straightforward easy to walk route from El Portillo visitor centre.

I am just putting up pictures of the flowers in the area as they are at their best at this time of year.

A cedro tree (Juniperus cedrus), the high mountain juniper endemic to macronesia (Atlantic islands), with the colourful scree behind it.

A cedro tree (Juniperus cedrus), the high mountain juniper endemic to macronesia (Atlantic islands), with the colourful scree behind it.

The very rare Tenerife endemic Cistus (Cistus osbeckifolia) on La Fortaleza

The very rare Tenerife endemic Cistus (Cistus osbeckifolia) on La Fortaleza

Shrubby scabious (Pterocephalus lasiospermus)

Shrubby scabious (Pterocephalus lasiospermus)

Teide marguerite (Argyranthemum teneriffae)

Teide marguerite (Argyranthemum teneriffae)

A view of Teide with Flixweed (Descourainia bourgaeana) in the foreground

A view of Teide with Flixweed (Descourainia bourgaeana) in the foreground

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About Sally Whymark

When I retired and moved out to Tenerife a few years ago, one of the things I really wanted to do was go walking in the mountains. The scenery is very dramatic, and varied. The views are amazing. The native birds and butterflies and other fauna are remarkable. But the flowers - they're just stunning. Little did I know how this would fire up my interest in plants. While living in England, I had always had an interest in flowers and plants, indeed I ran a plant nursery with my husband for many years, but had not spent a great deal of time pursuing botany. But when walking in Tenerife, I noticed all the unfamiliar shapes of the local flowers, and longed to find out more about them. There are literally hundreds of species endemic to just Tenerife (or even just one part of it), the Canary Islands, or Macronesia (the Atlantic Islands, including Madeira, Canaries and Azores). They are so exciting, and so many of them are really showy as well. So I have started this blog to share with you my excitement at all the great sights I see when walking in Tenerife. I hope you'll enjoy it - and want to come here and experience it for yourself.

Posted on May 20, 2013, in Botanical interest, Teide National Park, Walks in Tenerife and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Jacky Gurney

    Hi Sally, I have just returned form a great fortnight’s walking with your book. I found the background sections on geology and general information very interesting. Your directions easy to follow and we enjoyed especially the walks from Ifonche, such a beautiful area. Encouraging to see plenty of re-growth after last year’s fire. It’s nice to be able to identify the flora as we go along.Next year we’ll try the walks in the Orotava area. which we have never explored.We did 3 walks from the book and several old favourites from another book.The calima blew in and it was just too hot ,so walked from El Medano to Los Abrigos along the coast.

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